A Conversation with Lisa Graft – Part 1

Experiences, Leading Ladies, Pearls of Wisdom, Podcast

Don’t Cut your own bangs episode 28

This is episode 28 of Don’t Cut Your Own Bangs, with Danielle Ireland.

Lisa Graft created the blog I Am Mother of The Year. Now, this is one of those guests that I had never met before we recorded a podcast together, and I just want this to be the new way that I meet all people.

There’s something about a microphone that makes people go deep more quickly and I’m like, “Yes, I want more of this. Let’s cut through all the BS and get to the real meat of who we are, and what we’re about, and what excites us” – because, I don’t know, I feel like you just become best friends. It’s like the stepbrother movie, “Did we just become best friends?” I have yet to have someone disappoint when I meet them for the first time in this format.

So, I guess this is just my way of saying, selfishly plugging before I introduce Lisa, that I want to be your best friend and if you want to be my best friend, just call me and let’s record a podcast together because, I swear, it works like magic every time.

Lisa Graft is truly, truly a remarkable woman, mother, entrepreneur. She is the host of a radio show. She’s got this incredible blog, I Am Mother of The Year that – hello, talk about exploring the messy middle or feeling like everyone else has it figured out but you. She embodies the message of this podcast in a way that really brings it to life. And, I love that she is specifically featuring and talking about what it means to be a mother, a working mother, and everything in between and everything that entails.

Because, honestly, I feel like that was lacking in some of my first seasons. That’s a part of life that I’m passionate about. That’s a story that I want to tell and I love that Lisa helps us do that so beautifully with this episode. So, sit back, relax, and I cannot wait for you to enjoy Lisa Graft.

Want to listen along? Click HERE

Lisa Graft:
It’s so true.

Danielle:
I say as I wipe my tears. I’m like… All right.

Lisa Graft:
Oh gosh.

Danielle:
But yeah, I’m excited. I’m ready to just kind of jump in if you are.

Lisa Graft:
Totally.

Danielle:
Awesome. So-

Lisa Graft:
I’m probably going to take my phone out too and document.

Danielle:
Yes. Oh, that’s smart.

Lisa Graft:
I’m horrible at it but I’m trying to be better.

Danielle:
Me too. Okay.

Lisa Graft:
I might just take pictures, and then, post the stories later because I get too distracted.

Danielle:
That’s wonderful. Here. Wait, let me… Wait. Wait. I’m going to swirl it. Wait, wait.

Lisa Graft:
Oh yeah.

Danielle:
Nailed it.

Lisa Graft:
Done. Nailed it. Nailed it.

Danielle:
Okay. Let’s get this thing rolling. So, Lisa Graft, welcome.

Lisa Graft:
Hi. Thank you.

Danielle:
Hi. Welcome. Welcome to the Don’t Cut Your Own Bangs podcast recording in my attic/bedroom room.

Lisa Graft:
I love it.

Danielle:
Yes. Well, welcome. Welcome so much. Welcome so much. Welcome and thank you so much for being here. This is one of my favorite ways to get to know people and I’ve made some really great friendships through asking strangers, “Can I record a conversation with you, and then, share it publicly?” And, it always blossoms into something wonderful.

Lisa Graft:
Right?

Danielle:
Yes. So, I’m really excited to dive into this with you. So, you have created a blog, I Am Mother of The Year and I love, love, love, love, love, of course, like I’ve explored and dove into some of your content a little bit so I know I have a sense of it, but I think any listener who hears the meat of your mission and your tagline for this blog is going to instantly fall in love with you. A movement to equip and encourage moms to move from isolation, fear, and overwhelming chaos to community, confidence, peace and freedom. Hello?

Lisa Graft:
Right?

Danielle:
That’s like the William Wallace call. You need to be on a horse with blue face paint like, “Mothers, come with me.”

Lisa Graft:
Yes. Right?

Danielle:
Yes.

Lisa Graft:
Oh yeah. It’s as much for me as it is for every other mother.

Danielle:
Of course, yeah.

Lisa Graft:
So when I sit down and write, I’m like, “What am I working through? What is going on in my brain? How can I figure this out, and then, share my wisdom or lack of wisdom?” Most of the time it’s half and half. It’s like, I’m a disaster so if you have something for me, please, please.

Danielle:
Yeah.

Lisa Graft:
So, it’s good. It just takes the pressure off. I don’t feel like I have to know everything.

Danielle:
Right.

Lisa Graft:
I’m just like, “Hey, I’m here. I’m in the thick of it with you. Let’s go together and see if we can figure this out in a healthier way than it seems like some moms are doing.”

Danielle:
I think what I like about that is that there seems to be an emerging, I don’t know if trend is the right word, but I’ll go with trend. There seem to be an emerging trend of experts that are positioning themselves as experts in whatever field they’re wanting to help influence the world. And, it’s a hard line to tow, right?

Danielle:
I’m sure I fall into this a lot, offering advice, but then, if you lose your humility, then it feels like finger wagging. But then, if you’re maybe accessing too much vulnerability or sharing too much, then you’re making it about you and that’s not what people are coming to you for.

Danielle:
But, it’s such a funky balance. But, I do know that when someone has an air of humility of, “Hey, listen, this is what’s working for me, but this was also what I’m struggling with,” when someone does that well, I feel like I want to lean more into what they’re sharing, as opposed to feeling like I’m looking at a perfect Pinterest human who somehow always has perfect liquid liner and-

Lisa Graft:
Right. How do you do this?

Danielle:
And, the tangled hair that flows down to their waistline and still looks… and somehow they don’t have any split ends. I’m like-

Lisa Graft:
Right. What? How?

Danielle:
Who are these people?

Lisa Graft:
Yes.

Danielle:
And, I equal parts want to criticize them but want to know all their secrets.

Lisa Graft:
Right. Exactly. Well, and I have struggled with that at first when I’m thought about like launching this whole thing, I’m like, “Who am I to even say-“

Danielle:
Who am I?

Lisa Graft:
Who cares about what I have to say?

Danielle:
I do. I do.

Lisa Graft:
Somebody does. Right? And, I do. I care about what I have to say. And, if I’m not sharing my voice with the world, then what am I doing? You know? And, not everybody has to share their voice in blog form, and I’m on a radio show, and all of these other things, but I’m like, I have to be doing this because this is who I am.

Danielle:
Right.

Lisa Graft:
And so, and then, the other thing I would say to that, positioning yourself as an expert is, have you heard of Donald Miller?

Danielle:
No.

Lisa Graft:
He’s a marketing expert. And, he’s a published author. He’s got a podcast, and all of these things. But, he talks about, actually, the most successful businesses and people position themselves as guides instead of the expert.

Danielle:
Yes.

Lisa Graft:
Because nobody wants the expert, the hero, because it’s so unattainable. But, if you can position yourself as the guide in someone’s life, they’re going to be like, “Oh okay, Hey, we’re going to do this and then this and then this. Follow me.”

Danielle:
Right.

Lisa Graft:
“We’ll get there, we’ll figure it out together.”, and you guide someone along the journey. And so, that’s what I’ve made sure to try to focus on mostly is, I have no real answers but I maybe have a plan. But, it’s like starting with, “I am a mess.”, and sharing my mess first really allows other people to go second. And so, I think that’s one of the other things too. I will always lead with my mess first.

Danielle:
That is good. Share my mess first. That is wonderful, because I think that is what’s missing is, and I struggle with this too sometimes. It’s different when maybe I’m doing like a speaking event, or I’m doing a training or a workshop versus when I’m working with clients, and more professional therapeutic setting. It’s called self-disclosure.

Danielle:
If I share anything about my own life in a session that someone’s paying me for, for my therapeutic point of view, if I share anything about myself, I have to be really, really keenly sensitive and aware to… It’s almost like I have to police myself. Is this really about them? And, I do it very sparingly, but thankfully so far, and I’m sure there will be a day where I misuse this tool and someone won’t love it.

Danielle:
But, I find, even in that context, just when we’re reminded that, “Oh my God, we’re all human?

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
“Oh my God. It’s not just me? It’s not just me?”, and I love that though. Sharing your mess first. I’m going to remember that. I don’t tweet, but I would tweet that if I did, that’s a tweetable. Share your mess first.

Lisa Graft:
There you go.

Danielle:
Yeah.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah, because we have to be brave, I think. Not everybody is meant to go first, you know? But, if you can, if you can summon enough courage to go first, then you’re really inviting someone else to go second. You’re really operating, and “Let me free you by inviting you into my mess so you can share your mess.”, and then, the person behind you that’s like, ‘Oh.’ It has to be two or three people that would speak up that are going through the same thing as I am. And then, the community forms, and then, the loneliness disappears.

Danielle:
There is something about hearing you say that not everybody’s meant to go first that I felt my mind spiral in a tangent from that comment because it’s interesting because it makes me think about is, because I… Too many thoughts at once. Hold on. Brain fog, brain fog.

Danielle:
But, this concept too of originality and original content, or originating ideas. Let’s say, you going first, in the content. Oh, that’s all right. And, maybe, I think your phone fell.

Lisa Graft:
Oh.

Danielle:
I think it slipped right over there.

Lisa Graft:
Oh, okay. Sorry.

Danielle:
That’s okay.

Lisa Graft:
Edit.

Danielle:
You’re totally fine. I think it’s under the chair.

Lisa Graft:
Oh, boy, yep, sure is. Where are you? Got my calisthenics in for the day.

Danielle:
A nice little stretch.

Lisa Graft:
Yup.

Danielle:
But, this concept of originality, or going first, someone inspired you, and I don’t know who that was but in some context, because I’m really interested right now in exploring these themes of perfection, permission, and procrastination.

Danielle:
And so, when you’re brave with your story, you’re giving permission to the women and men, because I don’t know who all your followers are, and the people that consume your content, but the women and men that follow you, and read your blogs, and connect with your story, and purchase your products, they are definitely, and I think in that context, in that sense, following your lead, but who came before you?

Danielle:
Who motivated and inspired you? Or, who encouraged you to show you? And, maybe didn’t model in the exact way that you do it, but I know that I have a large tier of people that inspire me. Some of them are mentors I’ve never met. Clearly, all the books that I have right here next to us, those are all examples of Renee Brown’s my best friend, she just doesn’t know it yet.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
But, it makes me think a little bit more about, or maybe get more curious about, who are the people that, maybe, did either motivate, encourage, or push you to put your story out there, either through modeling something that felt like something aspirational to you, or maybe you saw something and you were like, “Oh, hell no. I don’t want to be that.”?

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
And, it motivated you in a different way.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah. Well there’s a lot of people that come to mind. And, first, I think, my own mom fostered this need to see people. She would always say, “Someone’s story is their most important thing.”, And so, back in the day when Oprah was starting her own network, my mom and I submitted for our own TV show so we could just share people’s stories and we obviously did not get picked otherwise I would be so famous right now.

Danielle:
But, you applied.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah, we applied just to like, why not? I just want to share people’s stories. And so, I went through this process of really discovering who I am. And, who I am, I’ve always been a storyteller, and so, and that’s taken a lot of different forms.

Lisa Graft:
And, I would say another person that I can point to from my past who just said, “I see this in you.”, when I could not see it in myself, and really allowed me to be really brave for the first time in my life, was one of my college professors. He moved into town and became the theater director, and then, became best friends with my parents.

Lisa Graft:
And so, we spent a lot of time together outside of class, and so, I really got to know him and he’s like, “Listen, next spring we’re doing West Side Story and you need to be Anita.” And, I was like, “Jerry, no, I mean, not in a million, billion years will I ever, ever set foot on the theater stage. It’s not for me.”

Lisa Graft:
And he was like, “Yeah. You will, and you are.” And so, he said that the summer before, and so, it took four months before auditions even rolled around and I walked into the room.

Danielle:
How long ago was this?

Lisa Graft:
This was 2006 or 2007. 2007.

Danielle:
Okay. You didn’t have a theater background prior to that?

Lisa Graft:
No. I always sang and I sang in church, and stuff like that. But, never, ever-

Danielle:
Did you pursue theater after your pivotal role as Anita in West Side Story?

Lisa Graft:
I did one show after that so I’ve only done two shows, and then, it just has not fit into life since then because it is all-consuming.

Danielle:
And, it’s usually in the evenings and in the weekends.

Lisa Graft:
Right. Yeah, exactly.

Danielle:
Well, I find that very interesting how there’s a little parallel connection there, because, I too had/have a college professor that was really, he was a mentor for me at the right time in my life when I really needed that particular of person to say, “You’ve got the stuff, you’re good, you’re worthy.” And, he didn’t actually say those words but he believed in me, and that’s how I internalized those messages. “I can do this.”

Danielle:
And, and he is now the associate dean for the theater department at Ball State, and I was a theater major there.

Lisa Graft:
Cool. Oh, my gosh. Yeah.

Danielle:
Yeah, And so, I was hungry, hungry, hungry into the theater. I was, gobble, gobble, gobble, give me all the theater. Well, actually no. To be fair, I went to pursue film and TV acting, and on-camera work. And so, I actually felt really inadequate. I could probably have a whole other podcast about my theater shame and insecurity because I didn’t know, other than like Shakespeare, I was like, “I don’t know who some of these people are.” But, that’s okay. Another time.

Danielle:
But, shout out to Professor O’Hara. He brought me into a community theater production because I didn’t make the first round of auditions into any of the theater production’s plays. He was like, “Come do community theater with me in Muncie.”, and I was in Bye Bye Birdie.

Lisa Graft:
Wow.

Danielle:
Yeah. So, similar turn of events. That’s so interesting.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah. But, it was that moment where I felt really alive. There’s something about being on the stage and telling the story. And, it all comes back to storytelling for me. But, it was him who basically forced me into it. But, I’m so glad because then the people that came to watch the West Side Story were directing Footloose in community theater the next year.

Lisa Graft:
And so, they were like, “Will you audition?” I’m like, “After that, of course I’ll audition.”

Danielle:
Of course, I’m a star, guys. Hello?

Lisa Graft:
And so, I landed the lead role as Ariel in Footloose, and it was just like this new found way to come alive, and it was awesome. It really did change my life. But, it was like the trickle of events was, quickly, I was working in a hospital right after graduation, and then, that’s when we were doing Footloose.

Lisa Graft:
But, I went to the local radio station to promote the show and sang on the air, and you do all that stuff. And then, they were like, “We really like you and we like your personality. Will you come work for us?”

Lisa Graft:
So, I left the hospital and moved over to the radio station in sales, which, blech, sales are the worst ever for me. And so, then I started just visiting the country morning show every morning. And then, it turned into coming in early, and then, it turned into, all of a sudden, I’m a co-host on the country morning show.

Lisa Graft:
And then, I just fell in love with radio. And so, then that. And then, I moved to Indianapolis and started working for a radio station down here. And now, I’m still in radio even today, and had I never been Anita in West Side Story, would any of that have ever happened? I don’t know.

Danielle:
Yeah. Oh I love those-

Lisa Graft:
Isn’t it wild?

Danielle:
Yes, The power of hindsight. Sometimes it can be a bear to look back and, especially, when we maybe aren’t proud of the choices we made, or maybe when we have don’t cut our own bang moments, which we’ll talk about later. But, when we feel like we’re where we need to be, we can look back and you can see how those seemingly unconnected, unrelated events led you to exactly where you needed to be.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah.

Danielle:
That’s wonderful.

Lisa Graft:
I know. Isn’t that awesome?

Danielle:
That’s the magic.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
Yeah. That was a wonderful story. I’m still basking in it.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah.

Danielle:
One of the other things that really caught my eye with all the different things that you offer on iammotheroftheyear.com, you have a Facebook community, and I know that that’s not new. Everyone knows what Facebook is. We all understand the concept, but I was curious because you seem to have such a strong community and strong presence already on your blog. How does the Facebook community, what’s the role that that plays, and how is it different than what you’ve already created through your website? I’m just interested in the relationship those two have.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah. I started the Facebook group because I really wanted a way to interact more heavily with people, and people know a lot quicker how to interact on Facebook versus interact with a blog. So, even if they’re reading, they’re not commenting. I don’t know who they are. And so, I’m like, “I don’t know how to get to know these women.”

Lisa Graft:
So, I have these Mother of the Year award stickers-

Danielle:
Yes.

Lisa Graft:
… that are so fun, and really were the reason why I chose the name I am Mother of the Year, and all of that. So, we can award women randomly in Target, in Kroger, in all the places. “You know what? You’re a really good mom.”, just with a sticker, and tears, and hugs, and crying and all the things. But then, I didn’t want them just to have that moment. I wanted them to have a place to connect. And so, on the sticker is the website, which links to the Facebook group.

Lisa Graft:
And so then, women get the sticker and then they join and they’re like, “Wait, I’m not alone. I was feeling this way. I got this sticker.” And, in my eyes, I believe that all of those interactions are completely divine. And so, it’s like, “Man, God knows what he’s doing.” Putting people together. And, you think, “Man, one small act of kindness, nah, it doesn’t really matter.” It absolutely matters to connect people.

Lisa Graft:
And, I’ve got a million sticker stories of how they’re life-changing. And I’m like, stickers to mothers, and I’m like, this is the weirdest, but it’s amazing. It really is. And so, that’s why I created the Facebook group so we could have this community, and then, just have an outlet for moms to just share their victories, and so, it’s mostly fun, sarcastic, but sometimes it’s serious, and we’re sharing other deep… I feel completely worthless today. I can’t do anything right.

Lisa Graft:
And then, it’s showering with support, and that’s all it is. It’s just a support, encouragement, celebration group. So, I don’t try to ask for advice. Some women do, but most of the time it’s like, “Yeah. My kid pooped four times out of his diaper today, and I just had to use a pad as a diaper because we ran out.” That’s real life, and you know what? If you don’t celebrate that moment, you probably cry about it, and shame yourself for it.

Danielle:
Yes.

Lisa Graft:
And so, it’s just switching the narrative in our minds. And so, it’s training ourselves to do that.

Danielle:
Yes.

Lisa Graft:
And so, that’s the purpose of the Facebook group.

Danielle:
I love that. So, it’s more interactive and you can have a direct connection, a direct line of communication, with the people that are interacting with your content.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah.

Danielle:
I love that. That’s really beautiful. And, the sticker. So, I don’t know if you’ve seen any of the, You Are Beautiful stickers.

Lisa Graft:
No, I haven’t.

Danielle:
In Fountain Square, there’s a building where You Are Beautiful is a message painted on the side of one of the buildings. I can’t think of the building off hand, but the woman who lobbied to get that painted on the wall also created these stickers, and I saw her do a TED Talk, it was an Indianapolis TEDx, maybe a couple of years ago. I was about to really make a really bold statement. I’ve traveled all over the country.

Lisa Graft:
Yes, in all of my travels, that’s right.

Danielle:
Yes, well-

Lisa Graft:
I’m coming for you, Ohio.

Danielle:
Yes. In all my worldly travels. It’s actually funny. I’m going to Cleveland this Sunday.

Lisa Graft:
Are you?

Danielle:
Yes. So, Cleveland, what? Yeah. But, I was in the smallest town in this little hole in the wall coffee shop in the middle of somewhere south of San Francisco. This town, I can’t even remember the name. And, this coffee shop was so small and operated by three people that were getting high while we were placing our order. But there, on their Square reader was a, You Are Beautiful sticker. And, I was like, “You guys. Connection, connection.”

Lisa Graft:
Hold on, man.

Danielle:
And, he was like, “Wow, that’s so beautiful.” And, that’s what the sticker says, yeah. But, anyway, I think what’s really powerful about that is that people can buy those and pass those on. It makes me think about that metaphor of the ripple in the pond.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah.

Danielle:
You hand that to someone, who hands it to someone, that hands it to someone, and you just never know where it can go.

Lisa Graft:
Right. Exactly. I like a good goosebumps when you said that.

Danielle:
You just never know.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
So, someone could be getting high and looking at your sticker in the middle of some town in California.

Lisa Graft:
There you go.

Danielle:
That’s the dream.

Lisa Graft:
Right. And I really think the stickers are… This one story, in particular. I gave a sticker to a mom down in Bloomington and I remember her because sometimes I’m awkward. Okay? Awkward is my specialty, I’m socially awkward. It’s just a thing and it’s awkward to approach a stranger, even if you’re going to say something nice to them. It’s weird.

Lisa Graft:
And so, once I get, target acquired, then I’m like, “Oh, but she… Oh, should I?” And then, I’m like, “I’m standing still. Push your card somewhere.” And then, I’m like, no, I have to circle back.”, because I want to give her the sticker. And, I caught her in three different aisles before I was like-

Danielle:
So, you stalked her first.

Lisa Graft:
I guess I’m a stalker, basically.

Danielle:
You stalked her. It’s almost like a game of double dutch, where you’re like, “okay, I’m going, no, no, no, back.”

Lisa Graft:
Exactly. And so, I finally gave her the sticker and she cried and we hugged and it was this beautiful moment that lasted 15 seconds. And then, she just, about a month ago, brought to the Facebook group, “Hey, you gave me this sticker and it was a week or so after my husband told me he wanted a divorce. And so, being a single mom was the weighing heavy on my mind and you can’t even imagine.”

Lisa Graft:
And, I’m like, “No, I can’t. I cannot even imagine.” And, why? I knew I had to give her that sticker. I knew. I stalked her for three aisles because she needed to know. And, she’s like, “That changed my whole day.” And, I’m like, yeah, but you change one day, and then, you change the way you treat your kids. And then, if you do that the next day too, then you’re starting a whole thing. We’re changing generations. We’re changing the future generation because of a sticker.

Danielle:
Well, and it’s what the sticker represents, and we could probably rattle off a lot of things that the sticker represents, but it’s connection, being seen. Beyond food, shelter, and safety, we want to be seen and heard.

Lisa Graft:
Right?

Danielle:
So, you saw her, and then, you listened to her for 15 seconds.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
Because I think when we’re knee deep in pain, or I call it my shame pit, we feel invisible and we feel alone.

Lisa Graft:
Oh, yeah.

Danielle:
Either we don’t want to be seen because of our shame or we feel like we’re not even worth looking at because of our shame.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah.

Danielle:
That’s really powerful. And, I think it also shows to how a simple act of kindness can be so transformative because… So, we’ve already talked about Oprah. Let’s bring her back into the fold because I love her.

Lisa Graft:
Yes.

Danielle:
She does epic things like schools in Africa, her own network, literally and figuratively, her own network, right? She’s best friends with Michelle Obama, Beyonce. Come on. So, with her billions of funds and huge company and resources, she makes big change happen in big ways.

Danielle:
And so, when I compare myself to that, which great comparison is the thief of happiness, it’s not a healthy or fun thing for anyone. So, from Oprah to women living picture perfect lives on Instagram, it doesn’t matter the scale. I feel small, and then, what can I possibly do? What could I possibly do? You can give a sticker.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
You can give a sticker.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
That’s a big takeaway. You’re inspiring me. You’re going to inspire me to think of a sticker. You’re going to inspire me to think of a sticker.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah.

Danielle:
And, in my sticker story I’ll be like, “And, I can give all of the credit to inspiring the sticker to Lisa Graft.”

Lisa Graft:
There you go. Perfect.

Danielle:
Yep.

Lisa Graft:
Yeah. Well, and I’ll tell you too, I have a nine year old friend named Addie who I’m friends with her mom, so she knows about the stickers and she ran for fourth grade student council on a sticker platform, because in elementary school that they have the word of the month, and they talk about it, and what it looks like, and all of that. And, she’s like, “What if then teachers and everyone on staff at the school could see a student displaying empathy, courage, kindness, and give them a sticker?”

Lisa Graft:
And so, that’s what she’s doing. In the elementary school over in Geist area. And, I’m like, “Yes, this is awesome.” So, she and I are going to sticker the world. We have big plans be on Ellen by 2023.

Jump in the episode HERE.

Danielle:
Yes.

Lisa Graft:
It’s going to go in every elementary school, with a sticker.

Danielle:
Yes, yes. You are going to be on Ellen.

Lisa Graft:
Right.

Danielle:
By 2023. You are going to be on Ellen.

Lisa Graft:
Yes.

Danielle:
You’re going to do it.

Lisa Graft:
Yep. Absolutely.

Danielle:
No doubt. Probably before.

Lisa Graft:
You think so?

Danielle:
Yeah. I think it will happen before.

Lisa Graft:
Okay.

Danielle:
So, this is documented and we can always play this back. If I’m right, beautiful. If I’m not, I’m going to bury it, but that’s okay. I have the power.

Lisa Graft:
If you’re right, you’re coming with me.

Danielle:
Yes. You can’t see it, but I did a double fist pump with both fists, so…

Danielle:
Thank you, thank you, thank you for listening to another episode of season three of Don’t Cut Your Own Bangs. I don’t want to slow down your momentum. If you’re in the middle of a binge, you keep going. You’ve got this. Just a couple more episodes left. Keep listening.

Danielle:
If you need a break too, I totally get it. I completely understand. Whatever you need, I am here for you. And, to that end, let me hear from you. Leave a comment, rate, review, subscribe, or shoot me a message at danielle@danielleireland.com. Either way, I hope you continue having an awesome day. I hope your day was maybe a little bit better after listening to this, but keep on keeping on, and thanks again for listening.

Check out more from the podcast HERE.

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LET’S STICK TOGETHER

Weekly Doses of Encouragement